Troubleshooting

MAGNALOCKS

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

TOUCH SENSE BARS

The door does not release when the bar is touched.


First, press the back up release on the back of the bar if the door does not release the there is a fault in the systems general wiring. Check the system wiring.
Second, if the door does release when you press the back up release button check the sensitivity adjustment potentiometer on the back of the board turning the POT clockwise will increase the sensitivity and the bar may begin to function.
Third, if the door does release when you press the back up release button and you have tried adjusting the sensitivity then you need to check the voltage for the bar at the six pin connector that connects the cable to the board. Checking between red and black with a meter you should see system voltage.
Fourth, if the back up button works, you have tried adjusting the sensitivity and you have good voltage at the six pin connector check the antenna wire and make sure it is connected to the bar via the Phillips head mounting screw also check to make sure that the screw is not stripped. Meter between the face of the bar and the point were the antenna wire solders to the board you should see near zero resistance.
If everything checks out contact the factory.

The door is always unlocked.


First, check for voltage at the lock if voltage is present and the door is not locked then the lock is the problem.
Second, if you do not have voltage at the lock check the sensitivity adjustment potentiometer on the back of the board turning the POT counter-clockwise will decrease the sensitivity and the bar may begin to function.
Third, if adjusting the sensitivity does not work try removing the red wire of the harness from positive DC if the door does not lock check for voltage between the white and black wire of the harness if you have no voltage then an upstream switch is more likely the problem.
Fourth, check the surrounding area for anything that might generate an RF field such as neon signs or loss prevention gates disconnect the device and see if the bar begins working properly, if it does then the addition of a 22,000 micro Henry inductor in-line between the board and the bar should solve the problem. If this does not work and everything else checks out contact the factory.

I can't adjust the POT into a range were the bar works.


This is almost always due to use of a switching power supply. Try running the bar off of a clean DC source such as a battery (minimum 12VDC ) if the bar begins working you can try to clean up the supply by adding 2ea. 0.01 micro Farad capacitors to the supply one between positive and earth ground and one between negative and earth ground. If this does not work contact the factory.

SHEAR ALIGNING MAGNALOCK

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock does not engage even though magnetic attraction is present.


The SAM operates by pulling the strike plate against the magnet face when the door closes, seating the conical buttons on the strike into corresponding machined holes at either end of the magnet body. If the buttons do not seat, the lock will not hold. There are three potential causes that can produce a failure of the buttons to seat.
First, the mounting alignment between the strike and the magnet body can be off so that the buttons don't line up with the conical machined holes in the T brackets. A misalignment greater than 1/8 inch end to end or front to back will cause engagement failure. You can normally visually detect such an alignment problem. Watch the strike closely as you very slowly close the door. You should see it "try" to move against the magnet body but note that the buttons are acting as stand-offs because they are not lining up with the holes. In some cases, this problem can be corrected by adjusting the door but re-mounting the unit properly is often required.
The second possible cause is that the gap between the magnet body and strike plate has widened to the point that the magnet can no longer pull the strike plate in. This can happen, for example, when the lock is mounted at the top of the door and the door sags downwards which increases the gap. Note that the gap is supposed to be 1/10 inch or the point at which the tops of the buttons just graze the magnet surface. If the actual gap is significantly greater than this, you have found the problem. It can be corrected by either readjusting the hanging position of the door or readjusting the level of the strike (by turning the two strike mounting screws) so as to reduce the gap to the correct dimension.
The final possible cause is that the strike mounting hardware has somehow become frozen so that the strike has lost its movement ability towards and away from the magnet body. You can check this by trying the move the strike by hand with the door open. If it will not move, dismount it and clean and lubricate (or replace) the mounting hardware.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, Check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment if the strike is mounted to rigidly proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, you can verify function of the Senstat feature as follows. Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments. With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check your control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

BPS SERIES POWER SUPPLIES

There is no DC output from the power supply.


First, look at the LED on the outside of the box if it is on then the supply is working and the problem is probably an open poly switch (fuse). To correct this on the 1AMP supply, disconnect the load for 15 seconds, correct any possible system shorts and then reconnect the load. On the BPS series supplies over 1AMP each output if fused and the output LED will be on if the output is working. If the LED is out disconnect the output using the associated slide switch correct the system short and then reconnect the output with slide switch. The LED should go on and the system should operate. If all of the LEDs are out use a meter to check between F1 and F2 on the power distribution board if you see system voltage here then your fire alarm has disconnected the system.
Second, if the LED on the outside of the box is out check the AC input, if there is no AC voltage present you have found your problem.
Third, if AC voltage is present check the AC input fuse.
If the AC input fuse is good and you have checked everything else call the factory.

Unit will not operate when trigger wire is connected to +V.


On a new installation, make sure that DC power (12 or 24 volts depending on the model) is connected to the red and black wires with correct polarity. When this is confirmed note that the UnLatch will never operate unless the springlatch plunger is pushed in by the springlatch. You can be "fooled" by this feature if you're trying to test operate the UnLatch with the door open. To circumvent this, use a pencil or other similar object to lightly push in the springlatch plunger and then close the trigger wire to +V and you will see the UnLatch plungers move. On a service call for a unit with successful operating history, in addition to the checks mentioned above, check to see if the door and latch have gotten into a warped situation where there is heavy pre-loading on the door. The UnLatch motor may not be able to release the latch under this condition, but you should be able to hear it trying to release the latch. The UnLatch will automatically shut down its motor if it can't release the latch within 1.5 seconds. It will operate normally when it is re-triggered. You should be able to try operation by removing the pre-loading by pushing the door closed with enough force to counteract the pre-loading. Note that this situation is more likely if power supply capacity is less than the recommended 3 Amps at 12VDC 1.5 Amps at 24VDC. To correct this "warped door" situation, have the door serviced and possibly increase the capacity of the power supply.
If the unit still will not function, note that it does have an internal microprocessor that could have gotten into a crash condition. This can happen some times if the unit is under-powered and has consequently stalled (the motor is not receiving enough power to operate the latch). While the motor is in the process of stalling, voltage to the processor will sharply drop and this can crash the microprocessor. A crash can also occur as a random event but this is unusual. The recovery technique is to de-power the unit, and then re-power it with the red and orange wires already connected (both then connect to +V). This re-initializes the firmware. Naturally, once this operation has been performed, return the unit to standard wiring (orange only connects to +V to trigger the unit.)
Finally, the unit could have experienced motor failure or other internal electronic failure. Call the factory.

Occasionally the unit will not operate.


Generally, this comes from too much door pre-loading possibly coupled with a low capacity power source. When the UnLatch can't generate enough torque to release the latch, it automatically shuts down but then operates the next time it is triggered.

The latch does not re-secure when the door re-closes.


This is not a problem with the UnLatch but is rather a problem with the installation. The latch is simply not moving into position. Make sure the door closer is properly operating to re-close the door with reasonable force.

The latch status sensing does not function.


The latch status output will change state when the springlatch plunger is pushed in. To check this, push the springlatch plunger lightly in with a pencil or similar object. Make sure the unit is powered when you make this check or the output contacts will not switch. If they still do not switch, call the factory.

DK SERIES KEYPADS

DK-11 Specific: Entering the code does not unlock the door.


Note if the red LED on the Keypad Plate goes on after the code is entered. If it does then the system is functioning normally and you need to check the lock and lock wiring. If the LED flashes once quickly the lock is drawing to much current or you power supply is under rated for the system. If the LED does not go on then the code is not being accepted and you need to re-program the system. If this fails call the factory.

DK-26 and DK-16 Specific: This unit appears dead.


Check that power has been connected using a voltmeter on the CPU board to make sure that the correct voltage is present. If the voltage reads very low, the problem may be that a fail safe lock being controlled by the DK-26 is drawing too much current for the power supply. Remove the lock from the circuit. If this restores proper voltage and operation of the DK-26, you'll have to determine if the power supply is undersized or if there is a short circuit in the lock wiring which is pulling down the power supply. If the DK-26 is receiving specified voltage, briefly short terminal SRC to terminal REX. You should hear the relay click. This confirms that the CPU board is working but for some reason, it's not reading the keys. Make sure that the keypad cable is connected exactly as shown in instructions. Pay particular attention to the keypad white wire going into terminal WHT. If this wire is not connected, the keypad will appear to be dead. If the relay doesn't operate when SRC and REX are connected, the CPU board has either tripped one of its automatic fuses or has some major problem requiring replacement. The DK-26 employs three special type fuses called PolySwitches.
PolySwitches look like capacitors. When a PolySwitch goes into overload, it automatically adds a high resistance to the circuit which limits current flow to about 100mA, protecting the circuit. Each PolySwitch protects against a particular problem and you need to know how to determine if the PolySwitch has tripped and how to correct the problem and reset the PolySwitch.
PolySwitch #1 comes into play when you are powering the unit from an AC source connected to the AC input terminals. It protects against an internal short on the board. If you are powering the board with DC voltage into the DC input terminals, ignore PolySwitch #1.
PolySwitch #2 protects against an internal DC short circuit on the CPU board.
PolySwitch #3 protects against a short circuit in the keypad which can be caused by skinned keypad wires or mis-wiring the keypad cable into the CPU board terminals. PolySwitch #3 will also trip if there are short circuit problems with the SRC, REX, UCD and HCD terminals.
To check the PolySwitches, apply the probes of a voltmeter to both PolySwitch leads with the board powered. If you are checking PolySwitch #1, set your voltmeter to AC. Set it to DC for PolySwitches #2 and #3. In the normal condition, the PolySwitch will be conducting current so you will read less than one volt. A tripped PolySwitch acts as a high impedance resistor so you will read several volts across the PolySwitch leads. If none of the three PolySwitches have tripped but the properly powered board will not operate its relay when SRC and REX are briefly shorted together, call the factory.
If you find a tripped PolySwitch, you have reset it. Overload current through the PolySwitch trips it so that it clamps the current down to roughly 100mA. The PolySwitch will continue to clamp until all power is removed for about 5 seconds. It is not enough to correct the overload condition; you have to depower the board for 5 seconds and the PolySwitch will reset itself.
If PolySwitch #1 has tripped, visually inspect the four large diodes on the board to see if a loose wire has fallen on them to create a short circuit. If you do not find such a physical problem that can be easily corrected, the board should be replaced although you should be aware that it can be operated with no problems from a DC power supply connected into the DC input terminals.
If PolySwitch #2 has tripped, and you are using DC power, make sure your input polarity is correct. Reversing your input polarity will trip PolySwitch #2. Otherwise, look for any loose wires that could be creating a short circuit anywhere on the board. If you can't correct the fault that is tripping PolySwitch #2, the board must be replaced.
If PolySwitch #3 has tripped, the overload condition is in the keypad wiring or in terminals SRC, REX, UCD and HCD. Carefully make sure that all keypad wires are connected to the correct terminals. If they are, temporarily disconnect the keypad and attempt to reset PolySwitch #3 by de-powering the board for 5 seconds. Once the board has been re-powered, momentarily connect SRC to REX to see if the board will function (the lock control relay will operate). If the CPU board resumes function, reconnect the keypad. If PolySwitch #3 trips again, the keypad will need to be replaced. If the CPU board did not resume function, disconnect any wires on the SRC, REX, UCD and HCD terminals and attempt reset. If this does not restore function to the board, the board will need to be replaced.

DK-26 and DK-16 Specific: Keys do not operate but I hear a beep every five seconds.


This is a diagnostic feature which indicates that one of the keys is being read as down (always being pressed). In that condition, the CPU board will not be able to read any other keys. It can happen because of mechanical failure within the switch element, or keypad wires that are shorted to each other. The latter problem usually happens when insulation is scraped off some of the wires in the keypad cable as it's being pulled through the door frame. You may be able to restore operation by rapping on all the keys. If this works, however, it is likely only a temporary fix and you should be prepared to change the keypad. Next, check the wiring of the keypad cable into the board. If you don't see any problems, the keypad will need to be replaced but you can restore partial use, if you wish, while awaiting a replacement. Put the positive probe of a voltmeter on terminal WHT and successively apply the negative probe on terminals BLK, GRY, BRN, BGE, ORG, PNK, and VIO. "Good" terminals will read about 11 volts. Two terminals, however, will read about zero volts. Remove the wires from the two terminals which read zero volts. If you are wondering why a single down key does not create a single zero volt terminal read, you should understand that the keys are in a two of seven matrix so the one to one relationship doesn't hold. When you remove the two wires from the zero volt reading terminals, you will disable several keys. You will be able to determine which keys are working by pressing each key and seeing which ones are echoed by a beep and LED flash. You can then establish a temporary Hard code using only the active keys.

DK-26 and DK-16 Specific: The keypad does not beep and the LED does not flash when a key is pressed (no echo).


A key is failing to be read when it is pressed. This can happen because of mechanical failure within the switch element, or from a broken or mis-wired keypad wire. If, however, the problem is with a wire, more than one key will be "dead". If just one key is not being echoed, the problem is with the key itself. You can, of course, use the unit for all operations that don't require that particular key but you will want to replace the keypad for full operation.

DK-26 and DK-16 Specific: Unit won't accept programming.


If the problem occurs on initial installation, usually it's caused by misunderstanding the programming instructions. Read them again carefully. Be sure you're not waiting more than 5 seconds between hitting keys as if you are, the entry will be ignored. Finally note that if terminals SRC and UCD are connected, all User codes will be disabled. If terminals SRC and HCD are connected, the Hard code will be disabled.

DK-26 and DK-16 Specific: The door opens on a short code that wasn't programmed.


This can arise through an unnoticed programming error. Suppose you want to program 4-5-1-2. But when the unit is in program mode, you forget to put in the two digit memory slot prefix but just directly enter 4-5-1-2. The microprocessor will accept this sequence and interpret it as code 1-2 in memory slot 45. You test the code by reentering 4-5-1-2 and the door opens because the sequence includes the real code, 1-2. Later it will be noticed that the door is opening on 1-2 as this is such a simple sequence that it will be entered. When you have any evidence that unknown codes (particularly short ones) are in the unit, it is best to erase all User codes and reprogram.

 

DIGITAL ENTRY SYSTEMS

We have an existing DK-26 entry system with the keypad on the exterior of the door. Can we add a second keypad to the interior of the door?


Yes, you can add a second keypad to operate the same door. It can be any of the following keypads. DK-26PBK (narrow black - indoor/outdoor), DK-26PSS (narrow stainless steel - indoor/outdoor) or DK-16P (single gang - indoor).

I would like to mount a DK-11 outdoors. Does Securitron offer a weatherized version?


No, we do not offer a weatherized version of the DK-11, but we do offer the WCC single gang weather cover and the WBB weather back box for the DK-11. The WCC and WBB will offer protection for the DK-11 when used outdoors; however, it still should not be used where it would receive direct rainfall. A caution should be noted here. The temperature range of the DK-11 is only operable down to +32 degrees F. If you have temperatures that drop below that range then do not use the DK-11 outdoors. A second concern would be the actual security of the keypad. The DK-11 is meant for lower security applications. Certain attacks on the DK-11 could cause the portal to open. Overall the DK-26 is a better choice for outdoor applications.

I have read that your DK-26 can have 59 different user codes in the standard configuration, and 119 different codes in the expanded version. How many codes do I get with the Wiegand Output version?


Wiegand Output version has no built-in code capacity. The Wiegand Output version is meant to attach to the Wiegard card reader input of most card access control manufacturer's reader panels. Actual code capacity would be determined by the software/hardware configuration of the access control system.

Is there any way that we can mount the narrow DK-26 keypad to the single gang electrical box without leaving an exposed opening along both sides of the keypad?


Yes, we offer the DK-CPSS cover plate for this very application. It is drilled to mount to single gang box and cover the opening while still providing a mounting plate for the DK-26 keypad. The DK-CPSS is available on in the stainless steel finish and is approximately 3" X 8" in size.

I have an existing electric strike and transformer. Will that be enough to power the strike and keypad?


No, usually you will need to provide separate power for the keypad system. If the strike has a large enough in-rush current to max out the transformer, the keypad system will crash. An inexpensive plug-in D/C power supply would suffice, such as Securitron part # PSP-12 or PSP-24.

EXIT CONTROL/PUSH BUTTONS - CABINET LOCKS - LATCH/BOLT MONITORS - MAGNALOCKS - EXIT DELAY - KEYSWITCHES - LOCK CONTROL PANELS

I have a door that has a closer and other apparatus at the top of the door. As a result there is not enough room to mount the Magnalock. Can I mount the lock on the jam rather than the header?


Yes, mounting the lock on the jam will not change the functionality of the Magnalock.

I have an in-swing door. I don't want to mount the Magnalock on the unprotected side of the door. What do I need to mount it on the inside (in-swing side) of the door?


We offer a series of "Z" brackets for this requirement. Typically you can face mount (use the "F" suffix lock, for example: M62F) the Magnalock above the door on the header. On the door mount the "Z" bracket (such as the Z-62CL) and then mount the strike plate to the "Z" bracket.

Are your Magnalocks available in any other finish?


No, the only finish on our Magnalocks is the standard satin stainless steel finish. However, we do offer a series of dress covers that meet most requirements. The dress cover will cover the entire assembly providing the desired finished appearance and as an added bonus it provides additional tamper resistance to the lock. Available finishes include BK-Black Anodized (example: DC-62BK), BP-Brass Polished (example: DC-62BP), CL-Clear Anodized (example: DC-62CL) and SP-Stainless Polished (example: DC-62SP.)

I have a set of double doors. I want to lock both doors with the Magnalock product. Do I need two separate locks (one for each door)?


Possibly, using two individual locks is certainly an option. Another option is to have two Magnalocks in a single housing such as the DM62. A third option with a double door (assuming that there is no center mullion) could be to use one magnet mounted in the middle of the jam with a split strike option. One split strike plate would mount to each door. An example would be the M62-SS which is a M62 Magnalock with a split strike. Be advised that you will have something less than half of the rated holding power of a given lock on each door leaf. For example the M62 has 1,200 lb. holding force, but with a split strike each door will have something slightly less than the expected 600 pound holding force due to the smaller strike surface area.

I have a high security application. It is important that for us to confirm that the lock is actually locked. Just knowing that the door is closed is not sufficient. Do you have anyway for us to confirm a locked condition on the Magnalocks?


Yes, by adding the Senstat (SC) option (example M62SC) to the Magnalock you will get a lock with an output that confirms the lock is secure. This feature confirms that the door is closed and locked.

I am having difficulty figuring our which lock is best for my various applications. Is there a "rule of thumb" that I should use?


Every application will have different requirements, but in general the following guide should help.

Door Type

Suggested Magnalock

Typical "Storefront" aluminum over glass M32 series or M34 series
Sliding Door M34R (R-recessed option)
Wood or metal door requiring a concealed installation SAM series
Herculite Door (with top & bottom rail) SAM series
Bi-Swing Door SAM series
Interior office door or corridor door (low to medium security) M32 series or M34 series
Interior office door or corridor door (medium to high security) M62 series
Steel Door (such as warehouse exit) M62 series
Very High Security such as a door in a detention center M82 series
Super High Security susceptible to attack such as a detention holding area Dual M62 or Dual M82 in full length vertical housing
Swinging Gate (Man Gate) M62FG with M62Z bracket
Swinging Gate (Vehicle Gate) M62FG with Z-62 bracket or M82SCFG w/Z-82 bracket

MAXIMUM SECURITY SWITCHES - MOTION DETECTOR EXIT PACKAGE - POWER SOURCES

I have used the Securitron power supplies on various access control projects. Do you offer anything for our CCTV installations?


Most CCTV installations require 24vac for camera power and Pan & Tilt power. For those requirements we offer the BACS-24-10. It supplies 10 amps of 24vac power. It includes a CCS-8A circuit board with eight individually switched outputs. Each of the eight outputs includes its own automatic circuit breaker. Additional outputs can be added with CCB-8A slave boards.

I have a requirement that states that I must automatically unlock all my doors upon the activation of the fire alarm system. I plan to use a common power supply for my locks, but which Securitron power supply must I use?


Any of the Securitron BPS series power supplies can be interfaced with a fire alarm system. The fire alarm system must provide a relay output for connection to switch the BPS power supply. The fire alarm relay must be able to carry the entire load of the power supply, i.e. if you have a BPS-24-10 then your fire alarm relay must be able to handle 10 amps at 24VDC.

If the main electrical power is lost & the lock power supply goes to battery backup it may create a condition where the locks unlock if main power is not returned before the batteries discharge. Is there anyway to set off an alarm should main power fail?


Yes, we manufacture the PSM - Power Supply Monitor for that very purpose. Available in either 12 or 24 volt versions it will work with any of our BPS power supplies of 2 amp or greater capacity. It also does three checks of the battery pack each day to make sure the batteries are fully charged.

I am configuring my system. The various components when added together are going to draw approximately 830mA at 12VDC. We need to have battery back up. Is the Securitron BPS-12-1 the correct power supply to use with this system?


No, we recommend that you allow 25% for a "Margin of Error" on any of our power supplies. This 25% allows for the current draw of the charging circuit as well as possible extra draw from long cable runs, etc. Therefore, 750mA is the largest load we would recommend for the BPS-12-1. The appropriate supply for your application is the BPS-12-3.

We have configured our system. We intend to use a Securitron BPS series power supply. We now need to figure out the size of our battery back up. What is the best method to calculate this requirement?


In order to calculate your battery requirement you need to know two things. First, what is my total load or current draw, and second how long (maximum length of time) do I need to maintain the load on battery. Add up all of the current draws of the items in your system. For example you might have a system with (2) M62 Magnalocks drawing 125mA each, (2) TSB-3 Touch Sense Bars drawing 25mA each, (2) DK-26 Digital Keypads drawing 190mA each, and (1) DT-7 seven day timer drawing 160mA all at 24vdc. Your total current draw will be 840mA. You would, therefore, need the BPS-24-2 power supply. If you need to back up this supply for four hours then you could use the chart below. The closest rating above 840mA is the 1A line. Go over to the 4 hour back up time and you will see that you would need 8 AH of batteries to maintain this system for four hours. If you use 12vdc batteries then you will need (2) 12v/8 AH batteries wired in series for this 24vdc supply.

UNLATCH SERIES DOOR STRIKES

I would like to use the UnLatch and Mortise UnLatch on an upcoming project. What do I need to do to prepare the jam to accept these strikes?


Probably nothing. The advantage of the UnLatch series is that it replaces the standard ANSI 4-7/8" strike plate without any cutting or modification. If you already have the door prepared for a 4-7/8" strike plate you are ready to go. Just verify that there is sufficient space in the jam to accept the body of the lock. The UnLatch requires 3-3/8" Long, 1-3/8" Wide, 2" Deep while the Mortise UnLatch requires 3-3/8" Long, 1-7/8" Wide, 2" Deep.

I don't work with electric locks very often. How do I determine whether I need an UnLatch or a Mortise UnLatch?


The UnLatch works with a cylindrical type spring latch or dead latch. The Mortise UnLatch works with a mortise lock. You can use the following illustrations to identify you lock:
Typical Cylindrical Lock (Use the UnLatch with this type of lock)

Typical Mortise Lock (Use the Mortise UnLatch with this type of lock)
 

We are considering using the UnLatch lock for an upcoming project with an access control system. One of the doors is going to be unlocked during business hours. Is the UnLatch rated for continuous operation?


One of the great benefits of the UnLatch is its motor driven mechanism. Unlike solenoid operated strikes that can overheat when the lock is held unlocked for extended periods of time, the UnLatch merely repositions the plungers and then waits for the re-lock command. As a result there is no overheating, as there is no solenoid being held.

I need to know the minimum wiring requirement for the UnLatch.


There are six wires on the UnLatch. Two are there for power, one to trigger the lock and three to provide an output to show lock status. Therefore, the minimum number of wires required to operate the UnLatch is three. Two for power and one for the trigger.

How far can I mount my power supply from the UnLatch lock?


That depends up on two factors. First what is the operating voltage, 12VDC or 24VDC? Second is what is the gauge of wire? The following chart will show you the allowable distance based upon operating voltage and wire size.

Distance (one way) 50 ft. (15 M) 100 ft. (30 M) 200 ft. (60 M)
Wire Gauge for UNL-12 16 14 12
Wire Gauge for UNL-24 22 20 18