Troubleshooting

MAGNALOCKS

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

TOUCH SENSE BARS

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

SHEAR ALIGNING MAGNALOCK

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

BPS SERIES POWER SUPPLIES

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

DK SERIES KEYPADS

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

DIGITAL ENTRY SYSTEMS

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

EXIT CONTROL/PUSH BUTTONS - CABINET LOCKS - LATCH/BOLT MONITORS - MAGNALOCKS - EXIT DELAY - KEYSWITCHES - LOCK CONTROL PANELS

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

MAXIMUM SECURITY SWITCHES - MOTION DETECTOR EXIT PACKAGE - POWER SOURCES

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.

UNLATCH SERIES DOOR STRIKES

There is no magnetic attraction between magnet and strike plate.


First, be sure the lock is being powered by a DC source and that polarity is correct (RED to positive DC BLACK to negative DC). If the Magnalock is wired in reverse polarity, it won't be damaged, but it will not operate.
Second, if the unit continues to appear dead, it must be electrically checked with an Ammeter. It must be powered with the correct input voltage and checked to see if it draws the specified current. If the unit meters correctly, then the magnet body is operating properly and the problem must lie in the mounting of the strike.

The lock is not holding properly (I can pull or tug it open).


First, check the strike and magnet face to see if something is interfering with a flat fit.
Second, the strike must be allowed to float around the rubber washer stack which must be on the strike center mounting screw. The magnet then pulls it into flat alignment. If the strike is mounted too rigidly, proper alignment can't occur and the lock won't hold. To correct the problem, try loosening the strike mounting screw to see if the lock then holds properly.
Third, if you are operating the lock on AC instead of DC or on half wave rectified DC (transformer + single diode) the lock won't hold. Half wave rectified DC is unacceptable; you must, at a minimum, employ full wave rectified DC (transformer + bridge).

The Senstat output is not reporting secure.


First, make sure that it is not reporting secure because a small obstruction or too stiffly mounted strike is causing the Magnalock not to hold properly. This problem can be corrected by cleaning the surfaces of the magnet and strike or establishing proper play in the strike mounting.
Second, verify function of the Senstat feature as follows:
Note that the core is separated into 3 sections from left to right. The Senstat output is created by the strike establishing electrical contact between the leftmost and rightmost core segments.
With the lock powered, use a conductor to connect the two outside segments. If the Senstat reports secure, then the strike plate is not making proper contact with the lock face. If using a conductor doesn't cause the lock to report secure, check to see if there is a broken Senstat wire. If not the lock must be returned to the factory for replacement.

The lock does not release.


When power is removed the Magnalock must release. If internal circuitry were to fail completely, the lock would only exhibit "stickiness" at a rough level of 5 pounds.
First, make sure that power is being removed from the Magnalock by the control device using a meter. If voltage is not dropping to zero check the control switches and wiring.
Second, check the face of the Magnalock and the strike plate for foreign material. Any material found should be removed using a piece of cloth and a non abrasive cleaner.

The lock rusts.


Both the Magnalock core and strike plate are plated and sealed following a military specification. Because of this plating and the sealed nature of the magnet, the Magnalock is weatherproof and may be used outdoors. If rusting appears, the most common cause is that improper cleaning (with steel wool for instance) has occurred and this has stripped off the relatively soft plating. Once the plating has been removed, it cannot be restored in the field, so the lock will have to be periodically cleaned and coated with oil or other rust inhibitor. A rusty Magnalock will still function but at reduced holding force. If the product is installed in a heavily corrosive atmosphere, such as near the ocean, it will eventually rust even with non abrasive cleaning. The only answer then becomes continued periodic removal of the rust.

Apparent electronic noise is interfering with the access control system.


Electric locks return voltage spikes on their power wires and also emit microwave radiation when switched. Note that Magnalocks include internal electronics which suppress both inductive kickback and radiation.
First, check the access control equipment it may be faulty or have been installed improperly.
Second, a problem can arise with the Magnalock. If the Senstat version is being used, the strike plate (which passes current) must be isolated from a metal door and frame. Securitron supplies insulating hardware to accomplish this but the hardware might not have been used or the strike may be scraping against the header for instance. Check for full isolation between the strike and the door frame (when the door is secured) with an Ohmmeter. The presence of lock voltage potential in the door frame can interfere with the ground reference of access control system data communication and therefore cause a problem.